Tag Archives: beautiful

Planetary: Rockin’

Carly Waito does these amazing small-ish oil paintings of mineral specimens. They’re all about 5″ x 7″, done with oil on masonite. From her website,

“Her meticulously detailed renderings of mineral specimens draw the viewer in, encouraging close inspection of the material qualities of the subjects. They explore the common impulse to possess pieces of the natural world which we find beautiful or curious and to assign complex layers of value to these objects based on a range of factors, such as rarity, historical context, personal memories, scientific significance, and subjective notions of beauty. They are an extension of her interest in natural history, collecting, curiosity, wonder, and the appeal of small things.”

 

Her paintings are so beautiful! If you want me to, I could use my mineral-and-rock-identification knowledge and tell you about their luster, etc.
So for the credit – I originally came across these images while browsing through the blog a desert fete (new favorite blog to browse; really enjoying desert day-dreams right now). Carly’s paintings also appeared on the artsy ‘but does it float?’

♥eth

Advertisements
Tagged , , , , , , ,

Planetary: Loyal Loot Log Bowls

What a title, eh? Loyal Loot Collective is a collaboration of four different, talented designers. My very most favorite of their products is their beautiful log bowls.

Look at all those vibrant colors! And all that wonderful, makes-me-wanna-touch-it bark texture left au naturel on the sides!

The bowls vary in height and diameter (from 2 – 10 inches), and they’re hand selected and turned from reclaimed wood (hooooray being green!). Surprisingly, they aren’t terribly expensive; I’ve seen them listed for anywhere from $34 – $100 to $60 – $120. I think that they look great in a grouping, as shown, on a mantle or shelf – or maybe even hung on a wall!

♥eth

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

Creating Color: Orange and Gray

[from top to bottom hex code #s: #DB6F27, #D6D5C9, #A4B1C0, #7A7C79, #EEEA8B]

Grey is a really beautiful neutral because it can have so many different colored undertones. I’ve featured a lot of greys so far that have blue undertones, resulting in a sort of undefined lavendar-grey situation. I’m not surprised – my favorite color is blue, so it seems logical I would be drawn to bluey-greys. The grey in my living room is actually more of a strange purple color than a ‘grey’.

The purpley-bluey-greys compliment the BRIGHT pop of orange in this picture beautifully. ALSO, not surprising since blue and orange are complimentary colors – meaning they’re opposite each other on the color wheel.

I can see this color palette as being really useful for website development or print layouts because of the variety of bright, stand-out colors and the subtle changes in neutrals. Also, I want to paint my door.

Happy coloring!

♥eth

(picture from Apartment Therapy)

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

Planetary: Jim Denevan

What’s more ‘planetary’ than a guy that makes Earthworks art?

Jim Denevan makes temporary drawings on sand
earth and ice that are eventually erased by
waves and weather.


Amazing photography! You can scroll through his galleries and click on the ‘explanation’ links at the top for more in-depth information about his individual works. All photos from this post are his, btw.

♥eth

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Planetary: Imogen Belfield

Nature and architecture seem to be a great source of inspiration for lots of beautiful things! Like this week’s Planetary feature on Imogen Belfield’s jewelry.

Imogen Belfied creates ‘experimentalist’ jewelery with a combination of different, interesting materials including porcelain, bronze, silver, steel, and gold. All of her pieces are hand-crafted and all of her pieces that use porcelain fused with metal are unique and individual; they cannot be recreated.

Experimenting with porcelain, gemstones, metals, dyes and glaze and creating casts from paper, plastics and even fruits, she aims to create work that is at once beautiful and challenging; modern yet classic, bold yet subtle. (via)

Beautiful and challenging, modern yet classic, bold yet subtle? Things we all strive for!

More of her work can be seen here.

♥eth

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

Art Education: Greeks, Etruscans, and Romans – Oh my!

We’re trekking through time at a quick pace! Last week we covered (MORE) Greek, Etruscan, and Republican Roman art. It’s a toss up between black-figure Greek painted vases and Republican Roman wall paintings as to which I like more.
For example, the Greek black-figure painted vases were really intricate and stunning, like this one of Achilles and Ajax by Exekias:

But the Republican Roman wall paintings were really cool, too. Romans were cool in general, though. They had indoor plumbing and roads and gladiators. And also, four different styles of wall painting. At the Villa of the Mysteries (cool name, too) ‘architectural’ wall painting was used to make the rooms look they connected to other rooms – making the wall an ~illusion~ – see:

♥eth

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Art Education: Greek

Nike of Samothrace is such a beautiful sculpture, even if she is missing her head!

Both styles of Greek art – classical and hellenistc – paid a lot of attention to detail and human bodies. ‘Contraposto’ balance was an important and amazing part of their sculptures – balancing the figure as a human body balances itself (i.e. if one arm moves, a leg has to shift weight, too). Unfortunately, a lot of their amazing sculptures remain today as Roman marble copies because the original bronzes were melted down for weaponry. The Romans couldn’t manage the balancing situation, so a lot of the figures have to be propped up by logs and bridges and vases, etc.

See this example of Hermes and the infant Dionysis has a cross on the right? That’s to keep the sculpture upright because this is a copy. Just Ignore his man parts if they offend you.

Anywhoo,
We’ve moved from Egyptian art into Greek art and we have our second exam today.
Thursday we’ll be starting Roman art. What I enjoy most about this particular art history class is how the art objects clearly relate to the culture of the people at the time. I can’t really say I felt as intrigued about the 359035 different types of impressionist paintings during art history II – because even though it said a lot about the progress of art at that time, I don’t feel convinced that it says a lot about the culture of people. With ‘Egyptian’ art we learn a lot about who Egyptians were, what they did, what they believed in and how these artifacts relate to their lives.

♥eth

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,
%d bloggers like this: