Category Archives: Planetary

Planetary: Rockin’

Carly Waito does these amazing small-ish oil paintings of mineral specimens. They’re all about 5″ x 7″, done with oil on masonite. From her website,

“Her meticulously detailed renderings of mineral specimens draw the viewer in, encouraging close inspection of the material qualities of the subjects. They explore the common impulse to possess pieces of the natural world which we find beautiful or curious and to assign complex layers of value to these objects based on a range of factors, such as rarity, historical context, personal memories, scientific significance, and subjective notions of beauty. They are an extension of her interest in natural history, collecting, curiosity, wonder, and the appeal of small things.”

 

Her paintings are so beautiful! If you want me to, I could use my mineral-and-rock-identification knowledge and tell you about their luster, etc.
So for the credit – I originally came across these images while browsing through the blog a desert fete (new favorite blog to browse; really enjoying desert day-dreams right now). Carly’s paintings also appeared on the artsy ‘but does it float?’

♥eth

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Planetary: Loyal Loot Log Bowls

What a title, eh? Loyal Loot Collective is a collaboration of four different, talented designers. My very most favorite of their products is their beautiful log bowls.

Look at all those vibrant colors! And all that wonderful, makes-me-wanna-touch-it bark texture left au naturel on the sides!

The bowls vary in height and diameter (from 2 – 10 inches), and they’re hand selected and turned from reclaimed wood (hooooray being green!). Surprisingly, they aren’t terribly expensive; I’ve seen them listed for anywhere from $34 – $100 to $60 – $120. I think that they look great in a grouping, as shown, on a mantle or shelf – or maybe even hung on a wall!

♥eth

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Planetary: Jim Denevan

What’s more ‘planetary’ than a guy that makes Earthworks art?

Jim Denevan makes temporary drawings on sand
earth and ice that are eventually erased by
waves and weather.


Amazing photography! You can scroll through his galleries and click on the ‘explanation’ links at the top for more in-depth information about his individual works. All photos from this post are his, btw.

♥eth

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Planetary: Imogen Belfield

Nature and architecture seem to be a great source of inspiration for lots of beautiful things! Like this week’s Planetary feature on Imogen Belfield’s jewelry.

Imogen Belfied creates ‘experimentalist’ jewelery with a combination of different, interesting materials including porcelain, bronze, silver, steel, and gold. All of her pieces are hand-crafted and all of her pieces that use porcelain fused with metal are unique and individual; they cannot be recreated.

Experimenting with porcelain, gemstones, metals, dyes and glaze and creating casts from paper, plastics and even fruits, she aims to create work that is at once beautiful and challenging; modern yet classic, bold yet subtle. (via)

Beautiful and challenging, modern yet classic, bold yet subtle? Things we all strive for!

More of her work can be seen here.

♥eth

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Planetary: Cecil Balmond

‘Earthquakes’ is one of those topics that everyone knows about, but no one really knows that much about it. We’re all familiar with earthquakes, but I doubt that most people know about P waves, PP waves, AND S waves! So how do ‘earthquakes’ relate to design? Cecil Balmond is a “is a world renowned designer, artist, mathematician, thinker and writer” and he challenges traditional theories about underlying mechanisms and design. Instead of relying on a skeleton to strengthen a building during an earthquake, he relishes the fluidity and flexibility of a structure with “overflowing kinetic energy”.

An exhibit earlier this year in Tokyo, Japan featured his work in three different ‘phases’, but all three focus on geometric patterns,and finding rhythms that develop naturally through genetic codes. Besides his ‘flowing kinetic energy’ concept, Balmond also wonders if it is possible to delegate the code that gives life’ to a building, and see if it could grow and flourish from this initial genetic code, instead of having everything about the structure designed from the beginning. Really interesting stuff! There’s a much larger description of the exhibit (and source of my info and pictures) here and more about Cecil Balmond here.

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